Wikipedia

Beta Test (film)

Beta Test
Theatrical release poster
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Nicholas Gyeney
Produced by Nicholas Gyeney

Edi Zanidache[1]
Written by Nicholas Gyeney[1]
Starring Larenz Tate

Manu Bennett

Linden Ashby

Kevon Stover

Yuji Okumoto
Music by Julien-K
Cinematography Michael Boydstun
Edited by Jay Somsen
Production

company
Mirror Images LTD
Release date
  • July 22, 2016 (2016-07-22)
Running time
88 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget Less than $2 million[2]

Beta Test is a 2016 American film written, produced, and directed by Nicholas Gyeney. Gyeney described the film as a cross between Die Hard, Gamer, and The Firm.[3] The film stars Larenz Tate, Manu Bennett, Linden Ashby, and Yuji Okumoto. The film was released on July 22, 2016.[4]

Plot [ edit ]

While testing the latest first person shooter from global game developer, Sentinel, video game champion Max Troy discovers the events happening within the game are being reflected in the real world. He soon determines that the game's protagonist is real-life Orson Creed, an ex-Sentinel employee who is being remotely controlled by the corporation for reasons unknown. As virtual and real worlds collide, Max and Creed must join forces to unravel the conspiracy before the game's sinister events escalate and overwhelm the city.

Cast [ edit ]

  • Manu Bennett as Orson Creed
  • Larenz Tate as Max Troy
  • Linden Ashby as Andrew Kincaid
  • Kevon Stover as Zane
  • Yuji Okumoto as The Surgeon
  • Brandy Kopp as Tech Support
  • Sara Coates as Abbie Creed, Orson's wife.
  • Edward Michael Scott as The Professional
  • Edi Zanidache as The Runt
  • Bill Sorice as Interviewer
  • Stefan Hajek as Slackjaw
  • Adrien Gamache as Caleb Angelo
  • Mark Riccardi as The 2nd Professional
  • Angela DiMarco as Lillian Brandt
  • Angela Okumoto as Reporter

Production [ edit ]

Development [ edit ]

Gyeney started developing Beta Test in the summer of 2014.[5][dead link]

Gyeney provided information on the film stating "this film has 127 scenes and with [my] Type-A personality, I have a very specific vision."[2]

Casting [ edit ]

Gyeney stated, "I'm not Steven Spielberg," while indicating that there would be no auditions or screen tests for the film. Scripts were sent out to actors whom Gyeney was familiar with, and those of whom liked the script with interest of being in the film were cast.[2]

Larenz Tate was cast as the protagonist, Max. Manu Bennett as the hero video game character, Orson Creed. And, Linden Ashby as Kincaid, the primary villain of the film.[6]

Filming [ edit ]

Principal photography was conducted in Seattle, Washington.[6] It took place over 19 days[2] starting November 7. 2014[5] and finishing on November 26, 2014.[7]

Seattle was chosen as the place to shoot the film because it is Gyeney's hometown and he believed "shooting such a movie in the Northwest will diversify the local film community, which is mostly dominated by indie dramas. It could lead to an entire wave of action-oriented material being shot here, which would bring tons of work to local stunt teams and stuff that is totally nonexistent right now."[6]

Gyeney stated, "the longest long-take fight sequence currently on record is three-and-a-half minutes, and it's held by the Korean movie 'Oldboy.' Our goal is to destroy that record."[6][8][better source needed]

Animation [ edit ]

Video game footage was needed to be developed for the film after principal photography was completed. It began in December 2014 starting with the character, Creed.[9][better source needed]

Release [ edit ]

The film was released on July 22, 2016. In their review for The Hollywood Reporter, Frank Scheck praised the film for being "impressively choreographed and filmed", though criticized the film for choosing technology over realism, as well as exploiting real life tragedies such as 9/11. He also criticized the "outdated visual style" of the graphics, which would be noticed by hardcore gamers, whom this film is targeted towards.[10]

References [ edit ]

  1. ^ a b Beta Test (November 6, 2014). "About Beta Test, Page Info". Facebook. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d Courtney Riffkin (December 14, 2014). "Northwest Wanderings. Behind the scenes of "Beta Test"". seattletimes.com. Archived from the original on December 21, 2014. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  3. ^ "Movie Review – Beta Test (2015)". Flickering Myth. July 23, 2016. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  4. ^ Murthi, Vikram (June 15, 2016). "'Beta Test' Exclusive Trailer: 'Arrow's' Manu Bennett Stars As a Man Controlled By A Video Game". IndieWire. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  5. ^ a b Nicholas Gyeney (November 4, 2014). "I guess it's about time I let you all know what we've been up to ..." Facebook. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  6. ^ a b c d Quinn Russell Brown (November 7, 2014). "Mill Creek filmmaker returns home to create his craft". theheraldbusinessjournal.com. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  7. ^ Nicholas Gyeney (November 26, 2014). "That's a wrap on #BetaTest!". Facebook. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  8. ^ Nicholas Gyeney (December 8, 2014). "A little peek at the "long take". A monumental moment for me, filming what is currently the longest single shot choreographed fight sequence ever". Facebook. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  9. ^ Nicholas Gyeney (December 2, 2014). "Hanging with the animation team for Beta Test, creating the video game footage for the film..." Facebook. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  10. ^ "'Beta Test': Film Review". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved September 4, 2018.

External links [ edit ]

What is this?