Wikipedia

ComeUntoChrist.org

ComeUntoChrist.org
Type of site
Religious website
Available in 35 languages
Owner The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
URL comeuntochrist.org
Launched 2001; 19 years ago (2001)
Current status Online

ComeUntoChrist.org, formerly known as Mormon.org, is a religious website maintained by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) that serves as a visitor site for people not of the faith. Mormon.org was changed to ComeUntoChrist.org in 2019.[1]

History [ edit ]

The first LDS Church website was LDSchurchnews.com in 1995 followed later by the official LDS Church website LDS.org in December 1996.[2] In 2001, Mormon.org was launched to "allow visitors to receive answers to their questions about the Church‘s beliefs".[2] In 2010, the LDS Church launched an update to Mormon.org that they called 'Mormon.org 4.0' that included new tools to create profiles for "explaining why they live their faith and why they are a Mormon".[3] This website updated coincided with multimillion-dollar television, billboard and Internet advertising campaign, called I'm a Mormon, that launched in 2010.[4]

On October 7, 2018, Russell M. Nelson directed the church to replace the terms 'Mormon' and 'LDS' with the official name of the church during an address entitled The Correct Name of the Church at the church's general conference meeting.[5][6]

As a result, Mormon.org was transitioned to ComeUntoChrist.org on March 5, 2019.[1] Simarliy, the domain for the LDS Church’s main website changed from LDS.org to ChurchofJesusChrist.org at the same time.[7] The LDS Church's First Presidency explained that the change is a “complex effort in numerous global languages and much work remains. We encourage all to be patient and courteous as we work together to use and share the proper name of the church.”[8] It was also announced that ComeUntoChrist.org will eventually be merged with the member-focused ChurchofJesusChrist.org at some future date.[9]

Content [ edit ]

As primarily an information site, much of the content is geared towards educating about the faith with articles such as 'What Are Temples?', 'God’s Plan for Us', and '4 Things You Should Know about the Book of Mormon'. The LDS Church maintains a number of content-specific websites such as familysearch.org (family history research), latterdaysaintcharities.org (humanitarian work), and byupathway.org (online higher education). A YouTube Channel tied to ComeUntoChrist.org has 300,000 subscribers as of 2020.

See also [ edit ]

References [ edit ]

  1. ^ a b Weaver, Sarah Jane. "LDS.org, Mormon.org, other Church sites and social channels make changes to reflect full name of Church", Church News, 5 March 2019. Retrieved on 28 March 2020.
  2. ^ a b Baker, Sherry Pack. "Mormon Media History Timeline 1827-2007", BYU Studies, Winter 2008. Retrieved on 28 March 2020.
  3. ^ "New Mormon.org Brings Mormons to the Forefront", Church News, 15 July 2010. Retrieved on 28 March 2020.
  4. ^ Goodstein, Laurie. "Mormons’ Ad Campaign May Play Out on the ’12 Campaign Trail", The New York Times, 17 November 2011. Retrieved on 28 March 2020.
  5. ^ Nelson, Russell M. "The Correct Name of the Church", Churchofjesuschrist.org, 7 October 2018. Retrieved on 28 March 2020.
  6. ^ Walch, Tad. "Name changes already underway at Latter-day Saint websites, Facebook pages and Twitter accounts", Deseret News, 17 August 2018. Retrieved on 28 March 2020.
  7. ^ Johnson, Stacy. "Domain, social media changes announced for Latter-day Saint communication channels", Provo Herald, 5 March 2019. Retrieved on 1 April 2020.
  8. ^ Carlisle, Nate and Noyce, Davie. "LDS Church, de-emphasizing those three letters, unveils a new internet address with more changes on the way", The Salt Lake Tribune, 1 April 2020. Retrieved on 5 March 2019.
  9. ^ Riess, Jana. "Why journalists will keep using the word “Mormon”", Religion News Service, 7 March 2019. Retrieved on 1 April 2020.

External links [ edit ]

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