Wikipedia

Hunyuan County

Hunyuan County


浑源县
Hunyuan is located in Shanxi
Hunyuan
Hunyuan
Location in Shanxi
Coordinates: 39°41′N113°41′E / 39.69°N 113.68°E / 39.69; 113.68Coordinates: 39°41′N113°41′E / 39.69°N 113.68°E / 39.69; 113.68
Country People's Republic of China
Province Shanxi
Prefecture-level city Datong
Area
 • Total 1,965 km2 (759 sq mi)
Population
 (2010)
343,486
Time zone UTC+8 (China Standard)
Postal code
037400
Website www.hunyuan.gov.cn
Hunyuan County
浑源永安寺.jpg
Yong'an Temple, Hunyuan
Simplified Chinese 浑源县
Traditional Chinese 渾源縣
Guo County
Simplified Chinese
Traditional Chinese

Hunyuan County is a county under the administration of Datong City, in the northeast of Shanxi province, China.

History [ edit ]

During the Spring and Autumn Period of Chinese history, present-day Hunyuan County formed part of the Baidi state of Dai[1][2] to the north of the Zhou Kingdom. It was conquered by the Zhao clan of Jin.

Under the Han, Guo County was established and placed under Yanmen Commandery and Pingshu County was established and placed under Dai Commandery.[3] Pingshu was later merged with Guo County, which was placed in Hengshan Commandery. During the Jianwu Era of the Eastern Han, Guo County was renamed. During the Three Kingdoms, Wei restored the name Guo. This was changed to Guoshan County by the Northern Wei, who placed it under the administration of Si Prefecture.[3] Under the Tang, it was placed in Yun Prefecture.[3]

Landmarks [ edit ]

The 1,500 years old Hanging Temple is an important and unique structure within the Datong area.

Demography [ edit ]

In 2010 the population of the district was 343,486 inhabitants.

See also [ edit ]

References [ edit ]

Citations [ edit ]

  1. ^ Keller & al. (2007), p. 16.
  2. ^ Yu (1997), p. 200.
  3. ^ a b c Shanxi Tourism Bureau (2016), s.v. "Hunyuan County".

Bibliography [ edit ]

  • www.xzqh.org (in Chinese)
  • "The Origin of the Names of the Counties in Shanxi Province", Official site, Taiyuan: Shanxi Tourism Bureau, 2016.
  • Keller, Peter C.; et al. (2007), Treasures from Shanghai: 5,000 Years of Chinese Art and Culture, Santa Ana: Bowers Museum
  • Yu Weichao (1997), A Journey into China's Antiquity, Vol. I, Morning Glory Press.



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