Wikipedia

Id Kah Mosque

For the mosque in Afghanistan, see Id Gah Mosque
Id Kah Mosque
艾提尕尔清真寺
Kashgar-mezquita-id-kah-d01.jpg
Religion
Affiliation Islam
Province Xinjiang
Ecclesiastical or organizational status Mosque
Location
Location Kashgar, Xinjiang, China
Shown within China
Geographic coordinates 39°28′20″N 75°59′03″E  /  39.47227°N 75.984106°E  / 39.47227; 75.984106 Coordinates: 39°28′20″N75°59′03″E / 39.47227°N 75.984106°E / 39.47227; 75.984106
Architecture
Architect(s) Saqsiz Mirza
Type Mosque
Completed 1442
Specifications
Capacity 20,000
Minaret(s) 3

The Id Kah Mosque (Uyghur: ھېيتگاھ مەسچىتى, Хейтгах МесчитиHëytgah Meschiti, Chinese: 艾提尕尔清真寺; pinyin: Àitígǎěr Qīngzhēnsì) (from Persian: عیدگاه Eidgāh, meaning Place of Festivities) is a mosque located in Kashgar, Xinjiang, China.

History [ edit ]

Id Kah is the largest mosque in China. Every Friday, it houses nearly 10,000 worshippers and may accommodate up to 20,000.[1]

The mosque was built by Saqsiz Mirza in ca. 1442 (although it incorporated older structures dating back to 996) and covers 16,800 square meters.

On 9 August 1933, Chinese Muslim General Ma Zhancang killed and beheaded the Uyghur leader Timur Beg, displaying his head on a spike at Id Kah mosque.[2][3][4][5]

In March 1934, it was reported that the Uyghur emir Abdullah Bughra was also beheaded, the head being displayed at Id Kah mosque.[6][7]

In April 1934, the Chinese Muslim general Ma Zhongying gave a speech at Id Kah Mosque in Kashgar, telling the Uyghurs to be loyal to the Republic of China Kuomintang government of Nanjing.[8][9][10]

On 30 July 2014, the imam of the mosque, hotelier Jume Tahir, was stabbed to death shortly after attending morning prayers.[11][12]

See also [ edit ]

References [ edit ]

  1. ^ Peter Neville-Hadley. Frommer's China. Frommer's, 2003. ISBN 978-0-7645-6755-1. Page 302.
  2. ^ S. Frederick Starr (2004). Xinjiang: China's Muslim borderland. M.E. Sharpe. p. 77. ISBN 0-7656-1318-2. Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  3. ^ James A. Millward (2007). Eurasian crossroads: a history of Xinjiang. Columbia University Press. p. 198. ISBN 0-231-13924-1. Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  4. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911–1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 93. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  5. ^ The British newspaper The Times reported that a turki chief was beheaded on August 25, 1933
  6. ^ Christian Tyler (2004). Wild West China: the taming of Xinjiang. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press. p. 116. ISBN 0-8135-3533-6. Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  7. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911–1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 123. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  8. ^ S. Frederick Starr (2004). Xinjiang: China's Muslim borderland. M.E. Sharpe. p. 79. ISBN 0-7656-1318-2. Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  9. ^ James A. Millward (2007). Eurasian crossroads: a history of Xinjiang. Columbia University Press. p. 200. ISBN 0-231-13924-1. Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  10. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911–1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 124. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  11. ^ "Xinjiang imam killed after clashes". 31 July 2014. Retrieved 22 August 2018 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  12. ^ James T. Areddy (31 July 2014). "State-Appointed Muslim Leader Killed in China". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 1 August 2014.

External links [ edit ]

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