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Jamaica, Land We Love

Jamaica, Land We Love
Jamaica, Land We Love (1962), page 1.png

National anthem of  Jamaica
Lyrics Hugh Sherlock (Yuu Shoerlak)[1], July 1962[2]
Music Robert Lightbourne (arranged by Mapletoft Poulle), July 1962[2]
Adopted 19 July 1962 (1962-07-19)
Audio sample
"Jamaica, Land We Love" (instrumental)
Played by the US Navy Band

"Jamaica, Land We Love" (Jamaican Patois: Jumieka, Lan Wi Lob)[1] is the national anthem of Jamaica, officially adopted in July 1962. It was chosen after a competition from September 1961 until 31 March 1962, in which, the lyrics of the national anthem were selected by Jamaica's Houses of Parliament. When Jamaica was granted independence on 6 August 1962, "Jamaica, Land We Love" continued to be officially used as the national anthem.

History [ edit ]

Prior to the declaration of the independence of Jamaica, Jamaica was made a West Indies Federation province of the British West Indies, still under the rule of the United Kingdom. The nation entered the federation under the rule of Premier Norman Manley, who also made various constitutional amendments to allow the process of decolonisation to rapidly take place.[3] These amendments also allowed the country to have more self-governing powers and permitted the formation of a cabinet led by a premier. Premier Norman Manley's participation in the West Indies Federation was unpopular and led to the independence of the country on 6 August 1962, and the national anthem selected in July 1962 was officially used from that date.[4][5]

In September 1961, the leading People's National Party announced a competition to write the lyrics of Jamaica's future national anthem, which would be judged by selected members of Jamaica's Houses of Parliament.[5] The competition received almost 100 script entries and the competition closed on 31 March 1962, after this ending date was decided on 17 March. The Houses of Parliament were given two options of anthems to vote for on 19 July 1962, and a script was chosen with an overwhelming majority.[5] The winning script was written by Reverent Hon. Hugh Sherlock, the music was composed by Hon. Robert Lightbourne, and the anthem was arranged by Mapletoft Poulle and Christine Alison Poulle.[6][7][5]

Lyrics [ edit ]

English Patois
First stanza

Eternal Father bless our land

Guard us with Thy mighty hand

Keep us free from evil powers

Be our light through countless hours

To our leaders, Great Defender,

Grant true wisdom from above

Justice, truth be ours forever

Jamaica, land we love

Jamaica, Jamaica, Jamaica, land we love.

hItornal Faada, bles wi lan,

Giaad wi wid Dai maiti an,

Kip wi frii frahn hiivl powa,

Bi wi lait chruu kountles howa.

Tu wi Liidaz, Griet Difenda,

Grant chuu wizdam fram abov.

Jostis, Chuut fi wi fieba,

Jumieka, lan wi lob.

Jumieka, Jumieka, Jumieka, lan wi lob.

Second stanza

Teach us true respect for all

Stir response to duty's call

Strengthen us the weak to cherish

Give us vision lest we perish

Knowledge send us, Heavenly Father,

Grant true wisdom from above

Justice, truth be ours forever

Jamaica, land we love

Jamaica, Jamaica, Jamaica, land we love.

Laan wi chuu rispek fi haal,

Tor rispans tu juuti kaal,

Chrentn wi di wiik fi cherish,

Gi wi vijan les wi perish.

Nalij sen wi Ebnli Faada,

Grant chuu wizdam fram abov.

Jostis, Chuut fi wi fieba,

Jumieka, lan wi lob.

Jumieka, Jumieka, Jumieka, lan wi lob.[1]

References [ edit ]

  1. ^ a b c "Jumieka Nashinal Antem". Jumieka Langwij. Retrieved 19 July 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Jamaica". National Anthems. Retrieved 1 August 2015.
  3. ^ "Jamaica: Self government". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 1 August 2015.
  4. ^ "West Indies Federation". Caricom. Archived from the original on 29 September 2013. Retrieved 1 August 2015.
  5. ^ a b c d "Anthem Pledge". Jamaica Information Service. 2015. Retrieved 1 August 2015.
  6. ^ Budd, Janice (28 August 2011). "The forgotten woman". Jamaica Observer. Retrieved 3 November 2013.
  7. ^ Douglas, Luke (18 October 2011). "National Anthem co-authors finally have their day". Jamaica Observer. Retrieved 3 November 2013.

External links [ edit ]

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