Wikipedia

Later Yan

Later Yan (後燕)


384–409
Later Yan in 391 AD
Later Yan in 391 AD
Later Yan in 398 AD
Later Yan in 398 AD
Capital Zhongshan (386-397)

Longcheng (397-409)
Government Monarchy
Emperor  
• 384-396
Murong Chui
• 396-398
Murong Bao
• 398
Lan Han
• 398-401
Murong Sheng
• 401-407
Murong Xi
• 407-409
Murong Yun
History  
• Established
384
• Establishment of Zhongshan as capital
8 February 386[1][2]
• Murong Chui's claim of imperial title
15 February 386[2][3]
• Evacuation of Zhongshan
27 April 397[4][5]
• Murong Xi's death
16 September 407[6][7]
• Disestablished
6 November[8][9] 409
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Former Qin
Northern Wei
Southern Yan
Northern Yan
Today part of China

The Later Yan (simplified Chinese: 后燕; traditional Chinese: 後燕; pinyin: Hòu Yān; 384-407 or 409) was a MurongXianbei state, located in modern-day northeast China, during the era of Sixteen Kingdoms in China.[10]

All rulers of the Later Yan declared themselves "emperors".

Rulers of the Later Yan [ edit ]

Temple names Posthumous names Family names and given name Durations of reigns Era names and their according durations
Shizu (世祖) Wucheng (武成) Murong Chui 384-396 Yanwang (燕王) 384-386

Jianxing (建興) 386-396
Liezong (烈宗) Huimin (惠愍) Murong Bao 396-398 Yongkang (永康) 396-398
Lan Han 398 Qinglong (青龍/青龙) 398
Zhongzong (中宗) Zhaowu (昭武) Murong Sheng 398-401 Jianping (建平) 398

Changle (長樂) 399-401

Zhaowen (昭文) Murong Xi 401-407 Guangshi (光始) 401-406

Jianshi (建始) 407

Huiyi (惠懿) Murong Yun1

or Gao Yun1

407-409 Zhengshi (正始) 407-409
1 The family name of Gao Yun was changed to Murong when he was adopted by the royal family. If Gao Yun was counted as a ruler of the Later Yan, the state would end in 409. It ended in 407 otherwise.

See also [ edit ]

References [ edit ]

  1. ^ "中央研究院網站". www.sinica.edu.tw.
  2. ^ a b Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 106.
  3. ^ "中央研究院網站". www.sinica.edu.tw.
  4. ^ "中央研究院網站". www.sinica.edu.tw.
  5. ^ Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 109.
  6. ^ "中央研究院網站". www.sinica.edu.tw.
  7. ^ Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 114.
  8. ^ "中央研究院網站". www.sinica.edu.tw.
  9. ^ Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 115.
  10. ^ Grousset, Rene (1970). The Empire of the Steppes. Rutgers University Press. pp. 59. ISBN 0-8135-1304-9.
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