Wikipedia

List of cinematic firsts

This page lists chronologically the first achievements in cinema. The development of cinema is characterised by technological breakthroughs, from early experiments in the recording of day-to-day activity, experiments in colour, different formats and sound. From the 1970s, the development of computer-generated imagery has become integral to the way that films are produced.

In parallel with the developments in technology, its content and the way it reflects society and its concerns and the way society responds to it have changed too. The list attempts to address some of these events.

Contents

19th century:1860s1870s1880s1890s

20th century: 1900s1910s1920s1930s1940s1950s1960s1970s1980s1990s

21st century: 2000s2010s

See also

References

19th century [ edit ]

1860s [ edit ]

1867-68 [ edit ]

  • Chronophotography is the first time that movement is captured in several frames of print.

1870s [ edit ]

1874 [ edit ]

  • French astronomer P.J.C. Janssen came up with the idea for a "revolver photographic". This huge camera system used a Maltese cross-type mechanism, very similar to the system that would later be of great importance in the development of movie cameras. He successfully captured both transits of Venus, 1874 in Japan, that of 1882 at Oran in Algeria. The motion picture was known as Passage de Venus[1]

1878 [ edit ]

1880s [ edit ]

1880 [ edit ]

1882 [ edit ]

1888 [ edit ]

1890s [ edit ]

1889 or 1890 [ edit ]

1891 [ edit ]

  • Dickson Greeting aka Monkeyshines 2, by William Kennedy Dickson is the first public demonstration of motion pictures in the United States. The National Federation of Women’s Clubs are shown a 3 second clip of Dickson passing a hat in front of himself, and reaching for it with his other hand on May 20, 1891 at Edison's laboratory.

1892 [ edit ]

1893 [ edit ]

  • Blacksmith Scene, by William Kennedy Dickson. The first Kinetoscope film shown in public exhibition on May 9, 1893 and is the earliest known example of actors performing a role in a film.[7]
  • The world's first film production studio, the Black Maria, or the Kinetographic Theater, was completed on the grounds of Edison's laboratories at West Orange, New Jersey, for the purpose of making film strips for the Kinetoscope. Construction began in December 1892[8]

1894 [ edit ]

  • On April 14, 1894, a public Kinetoscope parlor was opened by the Holland Bros. in New York City at 1155 Broadway, on the corner of 27th Street—the first commercial motion picture house. The venue had ten machines, set up in parallel rows of five, each showing a different movie. For 25 cents a viewer could see all the films in either row; half a dollar gave access to the entire bill.[9]
  • Dorlita in the Passion Dance Banned in New Jersey after use in peepshows. Russell Kick quotes the work Censorship as saying it "was probably the first [film] to be banned in the United States."[10]
  • la Sortie des Usines, the first film to be made in France.
  • The Dickson Experimental Sound Film by William Kennedy Dickson. It is the first known film with live-recorded sound and appears to be the first motion picture made for the Kinetophone, the proto-sound-film system developed by Dickson and Thomas Edison.[11]

1895 [ edit ]

1896 [ edit ]

1899 [ edit ]

20th century [ edit ]

1900s [ edit ]

1901 [ edit ]

1902 [ edit ]

1904 [ edit ]

1906 [ edit ]

1907 [ edit ]

1908 [ edit ]

1909 [ edit ]

1910s [ edit ]

1910 [ edit ]

1912 [ edit ]

1915 [ edit ]

1916 [ edit ]

1917 [ edit ]

1920s [ edit ]

1921 [ edit ]

1922 [ edit ]

1923 [ edit ]

1927 [ edit ]

1928 [ edit ]

1929 [ edit ]

  • The First Academy Award ceremony takes place at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, Los Angeles on May 1. Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans wins the award for "Unique and Artistic Production" (denoting artistic strength) and Wings wins the award for "Outstanding Picture, Production" (denoting technical production quality). Both awards were eliminated and merged the next year into the single Best Picture category. Emil Jannings and Janet Gaynor won the awards for best actor and actress, which were awarded for work in a number of different films throughout the year. Acting categories were later narrowed to honor work on a single film.[40]
  • Blackmail, directed by Alfred Hitchcock was the first British sound film.[citation needed]

1930s [ edit ]

1930 [ edit ]

1931 [ edit ]

  • Peludópolis, directed by Qirino Christiani is the first animated feature with sound.[32]

1932 [ edit ]

1933 [ edit ]

1935 [ edit ]

1937 [ edit ]

1939 [ edit ]

1940s [ edit ]

1940 [ edit ]

1943 [ edit ]

1946 [ edit ]

1947 [ edit ]

1948 [ edit ]

1950s [ edit ]

1951 [ edit ]

1953 [ edit ]

1960s [ edit ]

1964 [ edit ]

1970s [ edit ]

1970 [ edit ]

1971 [ edit ]

1973 [ edit ]

1975 [ edit ]

1976 [ edit ]

1977 [ edit ]

1978 [ edit ]

1980 [ edit ]

1981 [ edit ]

  • Looker by is the first film to feature a CGI human character, Cindy. Also, first use of 3D shaded CGI.[55][56]

1982 [ edit ]

  • For Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, ILM computer graphics division develops "Genesis Effect", the first use of fractal-generated landscape in a film.[57] Bill Reeves leads the Genesis Effect programming team, and creates a new graphics technique called Particle Systems.

1983 [ edit ]

1984 [ edit ]

  • The Last Starfighter uses CGI for all spaceship shots, replacing traditional models. First use of 'integrated CGI' where the effects are supposed to represent real world objects.[58]
  • The Sensorium is regarded the world's first 4D film.[59]

1985 [ edit ]

1986 [ edit ]

  • At the Canada Pavilion in Expo 86, Vancouver, Canada the first showing of 3D Imax takes place.[50]

1988 [ edit ]

1990s [ edit ]

1990 [ edit ]

1991 [ edit ]

  • Beauty and the Beast is the first animated film to have an Academy Award nomination for Best Picture.

1995 [ edit ]

  • Toy Story by John Lasseter is the first feature film to be made entirely using CGI.[63]
  • Casper, the first CGI lead character in feature-length film (preceded Toy Story by six months).

1998 [ edit ]

21st century [ edit ]

2000s [ edit ]

2000 [ edit ]

2001 [ edit ]

2002 [ edit ]

2004 [ edit ]

2010s [ edit ]

2019 [ edit ]

See also [ edit ]

References [ edit ]

  1. ^ The Passage of Venus , retrieved 2018-08-19
  2. ^ Clegg, Brian (2007). The Man Who Stopped Time. Joseph Henry Press. ISBN 978-0-309-10112-7.
  3. ^ "Cantor exhibit showcases motion-study photography". Stanford University. Retrieved 2010-02-03.
  4. ^ "Eadward Muybridge (1830-1904)". International Photography Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2010-02-03.
  5. ^ William, David. Life in the United Kingdom: The Land and the People. New Africa Press. p. 173. ISBN 978-9987-16-017-4.
  6. ^ "133 Years of Film:1889/1990 - Monkey Shines No. 1". Rowhtree.com. Retrieved 2012-02-16.
  7. ^ "PFSL : Blacksmith Scene". Silent Era. Retrieved 2012-02-16.
  8. ^ Robinson (1997). p. 23.
  9. ^ The machines were modified so that they did not operate by nickel slot. According to Hendricks (1966), in each row "attendants switched the instruments on and off for customers who had paid their twenty-five cents" (p. 13). For more on the Hollands, see Peter Morris, Embattled Shadows: A History of Canadian Cinema, 1895–1939 (Montreal and Kingston, Canada; London; and Buffalo, New York: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1978), pp. 6–7. Morris states that Edison wholesaled the Kinetoscope at $200 per machine; in fact, as described below, $250 seems to have been the most common figure at first.
  10. ^ Kick, Russ (2004). The Disinformation Book Of Lists. The Disinformation Company. List 68: "16 Movies Banned in the U.S.", Pages 236–238. ISBN 0-9729529-4-2.
  11. ^ "THE BOOTLEG FILES: "DICKSON EXPERIMENTAL SOUND FILM"". Filmthreat.com. Retrieved 2012-02-18.
  12. ^ Richard Misek. Chromatic Cinema: A History of Screen Colour. p. 15. ISBN 978-1-4443-3239-1.
  13. ^ "The guide to British Cinema and Movie History background". britishcinemagreats.com. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  14. ^ Bawden, Liz-Anne (1976). The Oxford Companion to Film. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780192115416.
  15. ^ "Where was the first permanent movie theatre in the United States located?". bestofneworleans.com. Archived from the original on 2012-05-25. Retrieved 2012-02-16.
  16. ^ "Help us find the Edison". Buffalo Film Festival. Retrieved 2011-05-20.
  17. ^ "Alice Guy Blache". The Herstory Network. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  18. ^ "The May Irwin Kiss". pictureshowman.com. Retrieved 2012-02-18.
  19. ^ https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0000704/
  20. ^ "King John". BFI. Retrieved 2011-05-20.
  21. ^ "The Year 1901". Filmsite.org. Retrieved 28 December 2017.
  22. ^ Elliot, Kamilla. Dickens on Screen. p. 117. ISBN 978-0521001243.
  23. ^ "World's first colour moving pictures discovered". Retrieved 2012-09-12.
  24. ^ Jones, Briana (2 March 2016). "These Are The Very First Movie Sequel, Remake, And Reboots Ever". all-that-is-interesting.com. Retrieved 13 November 2017. In 1904, director Siegmund Lubin released his own version of the film, under the very same name, and made it nearly identical to its predecessor.
  25. ^ Beckerman, Howard (2003-09-01). Animation: the whole story. Skyhorse Publishing Inc. p. 16. ISBN 978-1-58115-301-9. Retrieved 16 August 2011.
  26. ^ Chichester, Jo. "Return of the Kelly Gang". The UNESCO Courier. UNESCO (2007 #5). ISSN 1993-8616.
  27. ^ "Today in 1907 - Variety publishes first movie reviews". things-and-other-stuff.com. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  28. ^ "A Visit to the seaside". Allmovie.com. Retrieved 2012-02-16.
  29. ^ Davis, Richard (1999). Complete Guide to Film Scoring, Berklee Press, Boston. ISBN 0-634-00636-3, p. 17
  30. ^ "History of Hollywood". Hollywoodzing.com. Retrieved 2011-05-28.
  31. ^ Williams, Gregory Paul. The Story of Hollywood: An Illustrated History. p. 87.
  32. ^ a b "The Untold Story of Argentina's Pioneer Animator". awn.com. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  33. ^ "The Gulf Between - 1918 - Technicolor Premiere, Buffalo NY". Buffalo Film Festival. Archived from the original on 2012-01-26. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  34. ^ The American Film Catalog Feature Films: 1921-30 by The American Film I
  35. ^ a b "3D Movie Firsts". 3DGear.com. 18 May 2011.
  36. ^ "silentera.com". silentera.com. Retrieved 2010-10-14.
  37. ^ a b "Movie Sound Chronology". Spannerworks.net. 18 May 2011.
  38. ^ "Napoleon - Significance". Lesliehalliwell.com. Retrieved 2012-02-18.
  39. ^ "Vitaphone (1928-31)". georgegroves.org. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  40. ^ "History of the Academy Awards". Oscars.org. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  41. ^ Robertson, Patrick (2011). Robertson's Book of Firsts. London: Bloomsbury. Retrieved 24 May 2017.
  42. ^ "Short Film of the Day:Disney's 'Flowers and Trees'". Filmschoolrejects.com. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  43. ^ "Between action and cut". National Board of Review of Motion Pictures. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  44. ^ "La Biennale di Venezia - History of the Venice Biennale". labiennale.org. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  45. ^ Smith, Dave. Disney A to Z, Third Edition, (2006), page 33.
  46. ^ "First Cannes Film Festival". History.com. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  47. ^ "The Bafta Film Awards in numbers". The Radio Times. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  48. ^ GreenCine.com: "Black Cinema", by David Hudson (no date)Archived 2011-07-07 at WebCite Note: Asian-American interracial marriage had previously been portrayed.
  49. ^ "IMAX'S Chronology of Techonological (sic) Events". IEEE Canada, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Retrieved 2008-02-22.
  50. ^ a b "History". Imax.com. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  51. ^ Bowles, Scott (2004-09-15). "'Sky Captain' takes CGI to limit". USA Today. Retrieved 2010-05-25.
  52. ^ Visual and Special Effects Film Milestones - Part 9
  53. ^ "Know It All: The First Movie Commercially Released on VHS". Primer magazine. Retrieved 29 December 2017.
  54. ^ "Steadicam history". Steadi-onnfilms.com.au. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  55. ^ Visual and Special Effects Film Milestones - Part 10
  56. ^ Netzley, pg. 49.
  57. ^ Pegoraro, Rob (June 29, 2008). "Incredibles, Inc; The story of how computer programmers transformed the art of movie animation". The Washington Post. p. W8.
  58. ^ a b Visual and Special Effects Film Milestones - Part 11
  59. ^ http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/movies/cinema-with-a-new-dimension-20111006-1la3c.html#ixzz3Ci7Na2Cx
  60. ^ Netzley, 246.
  61. ^ Visual and Special Effects Film Milestones - Part 12
  62. ^ "The Short Films That Saved Pixar". openculture.com. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  63. ^ "Three Pixar execs get special Oscars". San Francisco Chronicle. February 1, 1996. Retrieved March 12, 2009.
  64. ^ "Titanic sinks competitors without a trace". BBC. February 25, 1998. Retrieved February 19, 2007.
  65. ^ Cahiers du cinéma, n°hors-série, Paris, April 2000, p. 32. Cf. also Histoire des communications, 2011, p. 10. Archived 2012-10-29 at the Wayback Machine
  66. ^ Robertson, Barbara (2006-05-01). "CGSociety — The Colorists". The Colorists. The CGSociety. p. 3. Retrieved 2007-10-24.
  67. ^ a b "Motion CaptureResources - History". motion-capture-system.com. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  68. ^ a b "Russian Ark". Artificial Eye. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  69. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-03-11. Retrieved 2012-02-18. CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  70. ^ https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/behind-screen/is-disneys-new-lion-king-an-animated-film-1054516
  • Netzley, Patricia D. Encyclopedia of Movie Special Effects. Checkmark Books, 2001.
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