Wikipedia

Ontario Highway 32

Ontario King's Highway 32.svg

Highway 32
Leeds and Grenville County Road 32
Route information
Length 19.6 km[3] (12.2 mi)
History Established July 24, 1929[1]

Decommissioned January 1, 1998[2]
Major junctions
South end  Highway 2 (King Street) in Gananoque
   Highway 401 (Exit 645)
North end  Highway 15 east of Seeleys Bay
Location
Counties United Counties of Leeds and Grenville
Towns Gananoque
Highway system
Highway 28 Highway 33
Former provincial highways
←  Highway 30    

King's Highway 32, commonly referred to as Highway 32, was a provincially maintained highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. The 19.6-kilometre (12.2 mi)-long route connected Highway 2 in Gananoque with Highway 15 east of Seeleys Bay, providing a quick alternative route between the two highways. It also featured an interchange with Highway 401. Highway 32 was assumed in 1929, and generally remained unchanged throughout its existence until 1998, when it was decommissioned and transferred to the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville. It was subsequently redesignated as Leeds and Grenville County Road 32.

Route description [ edit ]

Highway 32 began at Highway 2 (King Street) in Gananoque and proceeded north for 19.6 km (12.2 mi) to Highway 15.[3] Within Gananoque, the road was known as Stone Street North. An interchange with Highway 401 lay just north of the town, north of which the former highway travelled through farmland and forests.[4] Today, the route is known as Leeds and Grenville County Road 32, and lays entirely within Leeds and the Thousand Islands with the exception to portion within the town of Gananoque.[5]

History [ edit ]

Highway 32 was assumed on July 24, 1929, following the unimproved road between Gananoque and Highway 15.[1][6] The route was improved with a gravel surface by 1937 and paved between 1942 and 1949.[7][8][9]

The interchange with Highway 401 was opened along with the freeway itself on August 6, 1959, connecting the existing Kingston Bypass and Thousand Islands Parkway.[10] A new bridge was completed over the Gananoque River in 1961, bypassing the original route a short distance to the north and improving the highway geometry.[11] Highway 32 remained generally unchanged until January 1, 1998, when the entire route was decommissioned and transferred to the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville.[2] It has since been known as Leeds and Grenville County Road 32.[5]

Major intersections [ edit ]

The following table lists the major junctions along Highway 32, as noted by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario.[3] The entire route was located in Leeds and Grenville United Counties

Location km[3] mi Destinations Notes
Gananoque 0.0 0.0 County Road 2 (King Street) – Kingston, Cornwall Formerly Highway 2
Leeds and the Thousand Islands 1.6 0.99  Highway 401Kingston, Cornwall Exit 645
3.0 1.9 County Road 35
8.4 5.2 County Road 13
19.6 12.2  Highway 15
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References [ edit ]

  1. ^ a b "The King's Highways Assumed in 1929". Annual Report (Report). Department of Highways. March 31, 1930. p. 52.
  2. ^ a b Highway Transfers List - "Who Does What" (Report). Ministry of Transportation of Ontario. June 20, 2001. p. 9.
  3. ^ a b c Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (April 1, 1989). Provincial Highways Distance Table. Government of Ontario. p. 56. ISSN 0825-5350.
  4. ^ Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by Cartography Section. Ministry of Transportation. 1990–91. § G16.
  5. ^ a b Ontario Back Road Atlas (Map). Cartography by MapArt. Peter Heiler Ltd. 2010. p. 37. § A58–C59. ISBN 978-1-55198-226-7.
  6. ^ Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by C.P. Robins. Department of Highways. 1927. § J4.
  7. ^ Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by C.P. Robins. Department of Highways. 1937. § S7.
  8. ^ Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by C.P. Robins. Department of Highways. 1942. § S7.
  9. ^ Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by C.P. Robins. Department of Highways. 1949. § R40.
  10. ^ '401' The Macdonald–Cartier Freeway. Toronto: Ministry of Transportation and Communications. 1972. p. 9.
  11. ^ "District No. 8—Kingston". Annual Report (Report). Department of Highways. March 31, 1962. p. 105.

External links [ edit ]

Route map:

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