Wikipedia

Roman Catholic Diocese of Latina-Terracina-Sezze-Priverno

Diocese of Latina-Terracina-Sezze-Priverno


Dioecesis Latinensis-Terracinensis-Setina-Privernensis
Sanmarcolatina.jpg
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Immediately subject to the Holy See
Statistics
Area 1,371 km2 (529 sq mi)
Population

- Total

- Catholics
(as of 2016)

336,474

323,214 (96.1%)
Parishes 87
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 3rd century?
Cathedral Cattedrale di S. Marco (Latina)
Co-cathedral Concattedrale di S. Cesareo (Terracina)

Concattedrale di S. Maria (Sezze)

Concattedrale di S. Maria Annunziata (Priverno)
Secular priests 75 (diocesan)

53 (Religious Orders)

21 Permanent Deacons
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Mariano Crociata
Website
diocesi.latina.it (in Italian)

The Italian Catholic Diocese of Latina-Terracina-Sezze-Priverno (Latin: Dioecesis Latinensis-Terracinensis-Setina-Privernensis), in Lazio, has existed under this name since 1986. It is the historic Diocese of Terracina, Priverno e Sezze, whose existence was confirmed by Pope Honorius III in 1217, as a joining of the Diocese of Terracina with the Diocese of Priverno and the Diocese of Sezze under a single bishop. It is immediately subject to the Holy See.[1][2]

History [ edit ]

According to a local tradition, the first bishop of Terracina was St. Epaphroditus, who is claimed to have been one of Jesus' original seventy-two disciples, mentioned by Paul of Tarsus in one of his epistles.[3] The most ancient Christian record of the city is that of the martyrdom of St. Julianus, priest, and St. Cæsareus, deacon, who were cast into the sea under the emperor Trajan. The early date is rejected by Francesco Lanzoni, along with many hagiographical details.[4] In the third century, a Quartus is recorded by the "Passion of S. Caesareo" as a sacerdos, and martyr along with Caesareo; he is also mentioned as a martyr along with Quintus of Capua. There is no reason to think that Quartus was a bishop.[5]

The first bishop whose date is known with certainty is Sabinus. He was present at the Lateran synod of Pope Miltiades in November 313.[6]

It is claimed that an African priest, Silvianus, a fugitive during the Vandal persecution was bishop of Terracina about 443. The catalogue of Hieronymianus notes under 10 February: "iuxta Terracina in Campania natale Silvani episcopi et confessoris."[7] The story of his African origins first appears in an anonymous local historian of Terracina belonging to the 17th and 18th centuries. It is rejected by Francesco Lanzoni as being without foundation. He also rejects the date of 444, preferring to place Silvianus in the 4th century.[8]

Agnellus, Bishop of Fundi, whose city had been destroyed, was appointed cardinalis sacerdos of the diocese of Terracina by Pope Gregory I.[9]

The sees of Piperno[10] (Privernum) and Sezze[11] (Setia), situated on the side of the Lepinian hills, were united to Terracina, perhaps by Pope Alexander III, or even earlier.[12] The union of the three dioceses was confirmed by Pope Honorius III on 18 January 1217, during the episcopate of Simeone.[13]

On 16 July 1725, with the Bull "Regis Pacifici", Pope Benedict XIII restored the See of Piperno and Sezze, declaring them united aeque principaliter to the diocese of Terracina.[14]

Bishop Francesco Antonio Mondelli (1805) was exiled in 1809, for refusing to take the oath of loyalty to Napoleon, following the arrest, deposition and deportation of Pope Pius VII. He was deported first to the fortress of Chambéry in Savoy, and then to Trevoux in France.[15]

The Cistercian Abbey of Fossa Nuova is within the territory of this see. The diocese is immediately subject to the Holy See (Papacy).[16]

Chapters and cathedrals [ edit ]

The cathedral of Terracina, dedicated to S. Cesareo, was built in the 11th and 12th centuries,[17] on foundations of an ancient Roman temple, dedicated to Apollo,[18] or to the Goddess Roma and Augustus.[19] It was served and administered by a corporation, the Chapter, composed of twelve Canons, presided over by the Archpriest. Since the cathedral served as a parish church, the Archdeacon had the "cure of souls" (responsibility for the spiritual welfare of the parishoners).[20]

The cathedral of Latina, dedicated to S. Marco, was begun in 1932 as a parish church, at the same time that Latina was established as a city and the capital of its prefecture. The former Pontine Marshes, which had finally been drained after more than fifty years of work, were opened to agriculture, and the state sponsored a large-scale immigration from the Veneto, whose principal patron saint was Mark the Evangelist of Venice. The new parish church was dedicated on 23 November 1933, by Cardinal Enrico Gasparri, suburbicarian Bishop of Velletri. It was elevated to the status of a cathedral on 30 September 1986.[21]

The original church at Sezze was dedicated to S. Luke, the mythological founder of the christian community at Setina. There was a Romanesque church, which was seriously damaged in a fire in 1150. The latest known bishop of Sezze was Bishop Landus in 1178.[22] The Romanesque church was replaced, and a new church dedicated on 18 August 1364, by the Franciscan Bishop Giovanni of Terracina, Priverno e Sezze. It was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Pope Benedict XIII granted the old cathedral the title of "minor basilica".[23] By the papal bull of 29 April 1725, the church of S. Maria was reestablished as a cathedral and united aeque principaliter with the diocese of Terracina. The cathedral was staffed and administered by a Chapter, consisting of three dignities and twelve Canons.[24]

The cathedral of Piperno was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The old cathedral was destroyed in a fire in 1159, and Pope Lucius III dedicated a new cathedral in the summer of 1183.[25] The cathedral was staffed and administered by a Chapter, consisting of an Archpriest and twelve Canons.[26]

Diocesan reorganization [ edit ]

Pope Leo XIII had determined that all of the dioceses of Lazio should belong to one and the same ecclesiastical province. His successor Pope Pius X, however, decided to split the province into two, Upper Lazio and Lower Lazio (to which Terracina belonged), while the suburbicarian bishops would belong to a separate conference under the direction of the Vicar of the city of Rome.[27] The city of Latina, however, which was the largest in Lazio except for Rome itself, belonged to the diocese of Velletri, one of the suburbicarian bishoprics.

The Second Vatican Council, in order to ensure that all Catholics received proper spiritual attention, decreed the reorganization of the diocesan structure of Italy and the consolidation of small and struggling dioceses, in particular those with financial and personnel problems.[28] It also decreed that the natural population units of people, together with the civil jurisdictions and social institutions that compose their organic structure, should be preserved as far as possible as units. It was their wish that all of Lazio was to belong to one ecclesiastical province. Latina was recognized as an anomaly in terms of ecclesiastical organization. Therefore, on 12 September 1967, with the approval of Pope Paul VI, the Consistorial Congregation ordered that the part of the territory of Lazio that belonged to the district of which Latina was the capital was to be transferred from the diocese of Velletri to the diocese of Terracina, bringing a substantial increase in territory and population to the diocese of Terracina.[29] On the same day, in a separate decree, the name of the diocese was changed to "Terracinensis-Latiniensis, Privernensis et Setinus".[30]

On 18 February 1984, the Vatican and the Italian State signed a new and revised concordat. Based on the revisions, a set of Normae was issued on 15 November 1984, which was accompanied in the next year, on 3 June 1985, by enabling legislation. According to the agreement, the practice of having one bishop govern two separate dioceses at the same time, aeque personaliter, was abolished. This applied to the dioceses of Terracina-Latina and Priverno e Sezza. The Vatican therefore continued consultations which had begun under Pope John XXIII for the merging of dioceses. On 30 September 1986, Pope John Paul II ordered that the dioceses of Terracina-Latina and Priverno e Sezza be merged into one diocese with one bishop, with the Latin title Dioecesis Latinensis-Terracinensis-Setina-Privernensis. The seat of the diocese was to be in Latina, the largest city and capital of the province, and the cathedral of Latina, San Marco, was to serve as the cathedral of the merged dioceses. The cathedrals in Terracina, Sezze, and Priverno were to become co-cathedrals, and the cathedral Chapters were each to be a Capitulum Concathedralis. There was to be only one diocesan Tribunal, in Latina, and likewise one seminary, one College of Consultors, and one Priests' Council. The territory of the new diocese was to include the territory of the former dioceses of Latina, Terracina, Sezze, and Priverno.[31]

Diocesan synods [ edit ]

A diocesan synod was an irregularly held, but important, meeting of the bishop of a diocese and his clergy. Its purpose was (1) to proclaim generally the various decrees already issued by the bishop; (2) to discuss and ratify measures on which the bishop chose to consult with his clergy; (3) to publish statutes and decrees of the diocesan synod, of the provincial synod, and of the Holy See.[32]

In 1640, Bishop Cesare Ventimiglia (1615–1645) presided over a diocesan synod. In 1764. Bishop Francesco Odoardi (1758–1775) held a diocesan synod at Priverno. In 1784, from 30 May to 1 June, Bishop Benedetto Pucilli (1775–1786) held a diocesan synod in the cathedral of Terracina, the decrees of which were published in Rome in 1885 by the Salamonian press.[33]

A diocesan synod of the diocese of Terracina Priverno e Sezze was held by Bishop Salvatore Baccarini (1922–1930) in 1929.[34]

Bishop Giuseppe Petrocchi (1998–2013) presided over the first diocesan synod of the reorganized and renamed diocese of Latina-Terracina-Sezze-Priverno from 2005 to 2012. An extensive report of the consultations, Perché la nostra Chiesa sia "Più-Una", was published.[35]

Bishops [ edit ]

Diocese of Terracina [ edit ]

...
  • Sabinus (attested 313)[36]
...
  • Martyrius (attested 496–502)[37]
...
  • Petrus (attested 591–592)[38]
  • Agnellus (attested 592–598)[39]
...
  • Sabbatinus (attested 963–964)[40]
  • Benedictus (attested 969)[41]
...
  • Joannes (attested 986–994))[42]
...
  • Adeodatus (attested 1015)[43]
  • Joannes
  • Theodaldus (attested 1042)[44]
  • Joannes
...
  • Ambrosius, O.S.B. (attested 1064–1071)[45]
...
  • Petrus (attested 1092–1095)[46]
  • Benedictus (attested 1098–1105)[47]
  • Gregorius, O.S.B. (attested 1112–1126)[48]
...
  • Hugo (attested 1168–1179)[49]
...
  • Filegarius (attested 1196–1199)[50]
  • Simeon (attested 1203–1217–1224)[51]

Diocese of Terracina, Priverno e Sezze [ edit ]

United: 17 January 1217 with the Diocese of Priverno and the Diocese of Sezze

1217 to 1500 [ edit ]

  • Simeon (continued)[52]
  • Gregorius (attested 1227–1238)[53]
  • Docibilis (attested 1248)[54]
  • Petrus (attested 1257–1259)[55]
  • Franciscus Canis (attested 1263–1273)[56]
  • Franciscus, O.Min. (1273–1295)[57]
  • Theobaldus, O.Min. (1295–1296)[58]
  • Albertus (1296–1300)[59]
  • Joannes (1300–1318)[60]
  • Andreas (1319–1326)[61]
  • Sergius Peronti (1326–1348)[62]
  • Petrus (1348–1352)
  • Jacobus de Perusio, O.E.S.A. (1352–1362)
  • Giovanni Ferreri, O.Min. (1362–1369)[63]
  • Stefano Armandi (1369–1381?)[64]
  • Rogerius ( ? –1390) Roman Obedience[65]
  • Nicolaus (1390–1402) Roman Obedience[66]
  • Marinus de Santa Agatha (1402–1404) Roman Obedience[67]
  • Antonius (de Rossi) (1404–1411)[68]
  • Antonius da Zagarolo, O.F.M. (1411–1422)[69]
  • Andrea Gacci (1422–1425)[70]
  • Giovanni de Normannis (1425–1427)[71]
  • Nicola de Aspra (1430–1448)[72]
  • Alessandro Trani (1448)[73]
  • Alexander de Gaetano (1449–1455)[74]
  • Franciscus de Benedictus de Licata (15 Dec 1455 – 1458 Died)
  • Corrado Marcellini (1458–1490)[75]
  • Francesco Rosa (1490–1500)[76]

1500 to 1800 [ edit ]

Cipriano de Caris (1534 Died)[84]

1800 to 1966 [ edit ]

  • Michele Argelati, O.S.M. (1800–1805)[105]
  • Francesco Antonio Mondelli (23 Sep 1805 – 26 Sep 1814 Appointed Bishop of Città di Castello)
  • Francesco Saverio (François-Xavier) Pereira (15 Mar 1815 – 2 Oct 1818 Appointed Bishop of Rieti)
  • Francesco Alberini (29 Mar 1819 – 24 Nov 1819 Died)
  • Carlo Cavalieri Manassi (21 Feb 1820 – 19 Aug 1826 Died)
  • Luigi Frezza (2 Oct 1826 – 15 Dec 1828 Appointed Titular Archbishop of Chalcedon)
  • Bernardino Panzacchi (20 Jan 1834 – 24 Dec 1834 Died)
  • Guglielmo Aretini-Sillani (6 Apr 1835 – 4 Dec 1853 Resigned)
  • Nicola Bedini (19 Dec 1853 – 29 Sep 1862 Resigned)
  • Bernardino Trionfetti, O.F.M. (25 Sep 1862 – 23 Feb 1880 Resigned)[106]
  • Flaviano Simoneschi (27 Feb 1880 – 2 Jul 1883 Resigned)
  • Tommaso Mesmer (9 Aug 1883 – 12 Dec 1892 Died)
  • Paolo Emio Bergamaschi (12 Jun 1893 – 19 Jun 1899 Appointed Bishop of Troia)
  • Domenico Ambrosi (18 Sep 1899 – 17 Aug 1921 Died)
  • Salvatore Baccarini, C. R. (7 Mar 1922 – 30 Jun 1930 Appointed Archbishop of Capua)
  • Pio Leonardo Navarra, O.F.M. Conv. (29 Jan 1932 – 2 Feb 1951 Resigned)
  • Emilio Pizzoni (27 Mar 1951 – 6 Sep 1966 Resigned)

Diocese of Terracina-Latina, Priverno e Sezze [ edit ]

  • Arrigo Pintonello (12 Sep 1967 – 25 Jun 1971 Resigned)
  • Enrico Romolo Compagnone, O.C.D. (9 Mar 1972 – 22 Dec 1983 Retired)
  • Domenico Pecile (22 Dec 1983 – 27 Jun 1998 Retired)

Diocese of Latina-Terracina-Sezze-Priverno [ edit ]

Name Changed: 30 September 1986

References [ edit ]

  1. ^ "Diocese of Latina-Terracina-Sezze-Priverno"Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 20, 2016.[self-published source]
  2. ^ "Diocese of Latina–Terracina–Sezze–Priverno"GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved March 20. 2016.[self-published source]
  3. ^ Ughelli I, p. 1283-1284. The report is italicized by Gams, p. 731, column 2, as unreliable, and is labeled "ex trad." Lanzoni, p. 154 also rejects the tradition, labelling it a modern myth: "Certo è che la nostra diocesi laziale ignorò fino ai tempi moderni che quel discepolo di s. Paolo fosse stato il suo primo vescovo." In the "Epistle to the Philippians", chapter 2, Paul mentions that Epaphroditus had been sent to Rome as a delegate of the Church of Philippi, that he had become deathly ill but survived, and that Paul was sending him back to Philippi.
  4. ^ Lanzoni, p. 149: "La Passione di s. Cesario e gli Acta Nerei, rispetto al tempo del martire terracinese, non hanno valore probativo; quindi non è necessario credere che il martire risalga a tanto remota antichità."
  5. ^ Lanzoni, p. 154: "Ora, senza una ragione al mondo, per il semplice ricordo di Quartus nella Passione di s. Cesario, egli e il suo compagno furono introdotti nel catalogo vescovile di Terracina."
  6. ^ Lanzoni, p. 154. J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus II (Florence: A. Zatta 1759), p. 437.
  7. ^ Lanzoni, pp. 154-156. Cf. Tommaso Bauco (1841). Compendio della storia Veliterna (in Italian). Roma: Tipografia Antonio Mugnoz. p. 29.
  8. ^ Lanzoni, p. 155: "I due pervengono in Terracinti e, morto il vescovo Giovanni nel 443, i terracinesi eleggono per proprio prelato il profugo Silvano, che visse solo nove mesi († 10 febbr. 444), e dopo di lui nominano il padre suo Eleuterio che muore il 6 agosto 444. Ma questo racconto del primo storico di Terracina non ha alcun fondamento."
  9. ^ Kehr II, p. 115, nos. 5, 6, and 7. Lanzoni, pp. 156, no. 5; 163, no 3.
  10. ^ Kehr II, p. 123, places the union of Piperno and Terracina in the 11th century, but admits that there is no evidence: "Sed saec. XI — unionis certum tempus nequit adsignari — Pipernas episcopatus Terracinensi unitur...."
  11. ^ Kehr II, p. 127: "...at saec. XI, nescimus a quo pontifice, ecclesiae Terracinensi unita est."
  12. ^ In his bull of confirmation of 1217 (Ughelli I, p. 1294), Pope Honorius III, while referencing a transaction made for the benefit of Bishop Hugo by Pope Alexander III, remarks, "Praeterea praedictorum praedecessorum nostrorum vestigia subsequentes, Pipernensem et Ecclesias eidem Tarracinensi Ecclesiae in perpetuum unitas manere decernimus, cum omnibus juribis earum, rebus, ac pertinentiis...."
  13. ^ Ughelli I, pp. 1293-1295.
  14. ^ Bullarum diplomatum et privilegiorum sanctorum romanorum pontificum taurinensis editio (in Latin). Vol. XXII. Turin: A. Vecco et sociis editoribus, success. Sebastiani Franco et Filiorum. 1871. pp. 225–229.
  15. ^ Cappelletti VI, p. 605.
  16. ^ Umberto Benigni (1912), "Diocese of Terracina, Sezze, and Piperno." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 14. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  17. ^ Carlo Tedeschi (2016), "Le epigrafi del portale e del portico della cattedrale di Terracina," in: Arte medievale, Periodico annuale IV serie, anno VI (Sapienza Università di Roma 2016), pp. 45-50. ISSN 0393-7267
  18. ^ Ughelli I, p. 1283.
  19. ^ Karl Baedeker (Firm) (1900). Italy, Handbook for Travellers: Central Italy and Rome (13th rev. ed. 1900 ed.). Leipzig: K. Baedeker. p. 429. Michael Oppenheimer (2002). The monuments of Italy: a regional survey of art, architecture and archaeology from classical to modern times. London-New York: Tauris. pp. 50–51. ISBN 978-1-86064-570-9.
  20. ^ Ughelli I, p. 1283.
  21. ^ Diocesi di Latina-Terracina-Sezze-Priverno, "Cattedrale di San Marco;" retrieved: 25 May 2020.
  22. ^ Gams, p. 732, column 1.
  23. ^ Diocesi di Latina-Terracina-Sezze-Priverno, "Concattedrali;" retrieved: 26 May 2020.
  24. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 371, note 1. This was confirmed in the bull of 16 August 1725.
  25. ^ Diocesi di Latina-Terracina-Sezze-Priverno, "Concattedrali;" retrieved: 26 May 2020. Philippus Jaffé & S. Loewenfeld, Regesta pontificum Romanorum, Tomus II, editio secunda (Leipzig: Veit 1888), p. 455. This is known only from a copy of an inscription which is no longer extant: "Annus millenus centenus bis quadragenus ǁ Tertius aetatis Christi cum, Luci, dedisti ǁ Principium nostrae ecclesiae per te benedictae ǁ Stabit in aeternum felix struit ordo Pipernum ǁ Tempus erat vernum voluit sic esse supernum."
  26. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 371, note 1.
  27. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis 59 (Città del Vaticano 1967), pp. 985-986.
  28. ^ In its decree Christus Dominus, section 22, it stated: "Concerning diocesan boundaries, therefore, this sacred synod decrees that, to the extent required by the good of souls, a fitting revision of diocesan boundaries be undertaken prudently and as soon as possible. This can be done by dividing dismembering or uniting them, or by changing their boundaries, or by determining a better place for the episcopal see or, finally, especially in the case of dioceses having larger cities, by providing them with a new internal organization.... At the same time the natural population units of people, together with the civil jurisdictions and social institutions that compose their organic structure, should be preserved as far as possible as units. For this reason, obviously, the territory of each diocese should be continuous."
  29. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis 59 (Città del Vaticano 1967), pp. 986-987.
  30. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis 59 (Città del Vaticano 1967), pp. 987-988.
  31. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis 79 (Città del Vaticano 1987), pp. 797-800.
  32. ^ Benedictus XIV (1842). "Lib. I. caput secundum. De Synodi Dioecesanae utilitate". Benedicti XIV ... De Synodo dioecesana libri tredecim (in Latin). Tomus primus. Mechlin: Hanicq. pp. 42–49.George Phillips (1849). Die Diöcesansynode (in German). Freiburg im Breisgau: Herder. pp. 1–23. John Paul II, Constitutio Apostolica de Synodis Dioecesanis Agendis (March 19, 1997): Acta Apostolicae Sedis 89 (1997), pp. 706-727. (in Latin)
  33. ^ J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus 36ter (Arnhem-Leipzig: H. Welter 1924), p. 241.
  34. ^ Diocesi di Latina-Terracina-Sezze-Priverno, Il Libro del Primo Sinodo della Chiesa Pontina 2005–2012 (Latina 2012), p. 7. (in Italian)
  35. ^ Diocesi di Latina-Terracina-Sezze-Priverno, Il Libro del Primo Sinodo della Chiesa Pontina 2005–2012 (Latina 2012), passim. (in Italian)
  36. ^ Lanzoni, p. 154.
  37. ^ Martyrius is also mentioned in papal letters which may belong as early as 492. Pope Gelasius wrote to Bishop Martyrius (it seems) in 494 or 495 (Kehr, p. 114, no. 1). Martyrius was present at the first Roman synod of Pope Symmachus on 1 March 499, the third Roman synod of 23 October 501, and the fourth Roman synod of Symmachus on 6 November 502. J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus VIII (Florence: A. Zatta 1762), pp. 234, 252, 263, 268. Lanzoni, p. 156, no. 3.
  38. ^ Pope Gregory I complained in two letters to Bishop Petrus of his maltreatment of the Jewish community of Terracina, who had left the vicinity for a festival, and were now being kept out by him, and ordered Bishop Petrus to allow them their festival according to their custom. However, Pope Gregory ordered Bishop Petrus to deprive the Jews of their celebration, if their singing in their synagogue disturbed any neighboring church. Kehr II, p. 114, nos. 2 and 3. Lanzoni, p. 156, no. 4.
  39. ^ In November 592, Pope Gregory I wrote to Bishop Agnellus of Fondi, appointing him cardinalis sacerdos of the vacant diocese of Terracina. He also wrote to the clergy of Terracina, ordering them to obey Bishop Agnellus. After the death of Bishop Bacauda of Formiae in 597, Pope Gregory appointed Bishop Agnellus to conduct and apostolic visitation of the diocese of Formiae. Kehr II, p. 115, nos. 5, 6, and 7. Lanzoni, p. 156, no. 5.
  40. ^ Sabbatinus: Schwartz, p. 272.
  41. ^ On 26 May 969, Bishop Benedictus was present at the Roman synod of Pope John XIII. Ughelli I, p. 1291. Schwartz, p. 272.
  42. ^ Bishop Joannes made the vow that the inhabitants of the city should offer each year 6,000 eels to the monastery of Monte Cassino. Schwartz, p. 272.
  43. ^ Bishop Adeodatus was present at the Roman synod of Pope Benedict IX in 1015. Ughelli I, p. 1291.
  44. ^ I. Giorgi, "Documenti Terracinesi," in: Bullettino dell'Istituto storico italiano (in Italian). No. 16. Roma: L'Istituto. 1895. pp. 82–84.
  45. ^ A native of Milan, Ambrosius was a Benedictine of Montecassino, and an ecclesiastical reformer. Schwartz, p. 272.
  46. ^ Petrus: I. Giorgi, "Documenti Terracinesi," in: Bullettino dell'Istituto storico italiano (in Italian). No. 16. Roma: L'Istituto. 1895. pp. 84–86. Schwartz, p. 273.
  47. ^ Benedictus entered into an agreement with Abbot Petrus of Montecassino; he consecrated the church of S. Stephanus at Montecassino in 1103. Schwartz, p. 273.
  48. ^ Gregorius was a Benedictine monk of Montecassino, called "Columna Ecclesiae" by Peter the Deacon. He was a writer of hagiographies, hymns, and homilies. He attended the Lateran synod of Pope Paschal II on 23 March 1112. On 21 July 1126, he subscribed a bull for the benefit of the archbishop of Pisa. Ughelli I, pp. 1291-1292. Ughelli's claim that Bishop Gregorius attended the Council of Guastalla in 1106 cannot be verified; cf. Uta-Renate Blumenthal (1978). The Early Councils of Pope Paschal II, 1100-1110. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies. p. 42. ISBN 978-0-88844-043-3. Schwartz, p. 273.
  49. ^ It was during Bishop Hugo's administration that Pope Alexander III (1159–1181) united Terracina with the dioceses of Pipernum and Setia (Piperno e Sezze). Bishop Hugo was present at the Third Lateran Council in March 1179. Ughelli I, pp. 1292, 1294; cf. Kehr II, p. 119, no. 9.
  50. ^ According to a citation by Contatore from the Chronicon Fossae Novae, a Bishop "Tedelgarius" of Terracina took part in the dedication of the church of S. Maria de flumine de Ceccano in 1196. He is also recorded in a document of 1199. Dominicus Antonius Contator (1706). De historia Terracinensi libri quinque (in Latin). Roma: Luigi e Francesco de Comitibus. p. 389. Anton Haidacher, ed. (1979). Die Register Innocenz' III.: Pontifikatsjahr, 1199. Publikationen der Abteilung für Historische Studien des Österreichischen Kulturinstituts in Rom : 2. Abt., Quellen : 1. Reihe (in German and Latin). Vol. II. Graz: H. Böhlaus Nachf. pp. 350–351. ISBN 978-3-7001-0291-5.
  51. ^ Simeon: Eubel I, p. 478 with note 1.
  52. ^ Simeon was still in office on 5 February 1224. Cappelletti, p. 544.
  53. ^ Bishop Gregorius was already in office in 1227, according to Gams, p. 732. On 23 October 1238, Pope Gregory IX appointed Marcus de Ferentino, a chaplain of the Bishop of Ostia, as coadjutor bishop for Bishop Gregorius. Gregory was still in office on 20 March 1238. Cappelletti, pp. 544-545. Eubel I, p. 472 with note 2.
  54. ^ Bishop Docibilis granted the Archpriest and Canons of Terracina the church of S. Donato and the adjacent hospitium, with all of their lands, vines, and gardens. Ughelli I, p. 1296. Cappelletti VI, p. 547.
  55. ^ Ughelli I, p. 1296. Cappelletti VI, p. 547. Gams, p. 732, column 1.
  56. ^ Franciscus was the son of Guttifredus Canis. On the death of Bishop Petrus, the cathedral Chapter met, with the license of Pope Urban IV, and decided to follow the canonical "Way of Compromise", appointing two Canons to place in the hands of Cardinal Jordanus Pirunti of Ss. Cosmas e Damiano the duty of selecting the next bishop. The cardinal chose Bishop Franciscus of Bitetto, and his choice was ratified by Pope Urban on 28 August 1263. Ughelli I, pp. 1296-1297 (who conflates material about the two Franciscus). Jean Guiraud (1901). Les registres d'Urbain IV (1261-1264) (in Latin). Paris: A. Fontemoing. pp. 468, no. 351. Eubel I, pp. 138, 478 with note 3.
  57. ^ Bishop Franciscus, O.Min, was present at the burial of Thomas Aquinas, O.P. at the monastery of Fossa Nova in 1274. Franciscus was transferred to the diocese of Avellino on 8 April 1295. Lucas Wadding, Annales Minorum IV, editio secunda (Rome: Typis Rochi Bernabò 1732), p. 411, no. xxxv. Eubel I, pp. 122; 478, note 3.
  58. ^ Bishop Theobaldus had been Bishop of Stabiae. He was appointed Bishop of Terracina by Pope Boniface VIII on the same day that Bishop Franciscus was transferred to Avellino, 8 April 1295. Theobaldus was transferred to the diocese of Assisi on 13 February 1296, having served in Terracina for only ten months. Antoine Thomas, Les registres de Boniface VIII Tomus I, fasc. 1 (Paris: Ernest Thorin 1884), p. 29, no. 68. Eubel I, pp. 113, 462, 478.
  59. ^ Albertus was appointed Bishop of Terracina by Boniface VIII on 13 February 1296, as Bishop Theobaldus was transferred to Assisi. Albertus was transferred to the diocese of Capua on 3 June 1300. Ughelli I, p. 1297. Eubel I, pp. 165, 478.
  60. ^ Joannes was a Canon of the cathedral of Bologna. He was appointed Bishop of Terracina on the same day that Bishop Albert was transferred to Capua, 3 June 1300. Les registres de Boniface VIII p. 724, no. 3624. Eubel I, p. 478.
  61. ^ Andreas had been Bishop-elect of Teramo when he was named Bishop of Terracina by Pope John XXII on 20 April 1319. Bishop Andreas was papal Vicar of the city of Rome from 1322 to 1325. He died at the papal Court in Avignon. Ughelli I, p. 1297. Eubel I, p. 478 with note 7.
  62. ^ Sergius Perumptus was a Canon of the cathedral of Terracina, and in orders of a subdeacon. He had been coadjutor for Bishop Andreas, who was on papal service. He was appointed Bishop of Terracina by Pope John XXII, who had reserved the right of appointment to himself, on 21 May 1326. He required a dispensation super defectu natalium (illegitimacy), and another to receive major Holy Orders at one time, without observing canonical requirements of service in grade. He died in 1348, before November. Cappelletti VI, p. 553. G. Mollat, Jean XXII. Lettres communes, Tome sixième (Paris: Fontemoing 1912), p. 201, nos. 25427, 25430. Eubel I, p. 478 with note 8.
  63. ^ Bishop Giovanni consecrated the cathedral;
  64. ^ Ughelli I, p. 1297, states that he was still in office in 1396.
  65. ^ Rogerius was an appointee of Pope Boniface IX (1389–1404). His successor was appointed by Boniface IX on 25 May 1390. Eubel I, p. 478.
  66. ^ Nicolaus (Pocciarelli) was transferred to Segni, his home town, on 18 August 1402, by Boniface IX. Ughelli I, p. 1298. Eubel I, pp. 451, 498.
  67. ^ He is given the sobriquet "Magnus Merula" by the monk Michael. Marinus was a Canon of the cathedral of Fermo and a papal "scriptor apostolicus". He was an intimate of Pope Boniface IX, who appointed him Bishop of Terracina on 18 September 1402. He was transferred to the diocese of Gaeta on 14 May 1404. Pope Gregory XII is said to have deposed him. Ughelli I, p. 1298. Eubel I, pp. 258, 478.
  68. ^ Antonius (de Rossi or de Rocci) had been Bishop of Guardialfiera (1392–1400), Bishop of Gravina (1400–1402), and then Bishop of Isola (1402). He was appointed Bishop of Isernia by Boniface IX on 2 October 1402. He was transferred to Terracina by Pope Innocent VII on 12 July 1404. At the Council of Pisa, on 5 June 1409, Innocent VII's successor, Gregory XII, was deposed as a perjurer and heretic. Bishop Antonio chose to continue in his obedience, and accepted the position of Vicar General in spiritual matters in the province of Campania Marittima. He was therefore deposed on 9 March 1411 by Pope John XXIII (Cossa). He died in 1425. Ughelli I, p. 1298. Eubel I, pp. 268, 269, 285, 287, 478.
  69. ^ Fra Antonio was appointed Bishop of Terracina on 9 March 1411 by Pope John XXIII. He was transferred to the diocese of Gaeta on 20 May 1422. He died in 1427. Eubel I, pp. 258, 478.
  70. ^ Gacci had been a Canon of the cathedral of Palestrina. He was appointed by Pope Martin V on 20 May 1422. He died in 1425. Eubel II, p. 478.
  71. ^ Giovanni, who had been a Canon of the Basilica of the XII Apostles in Rome, was appointed Bishop of Terracina by Pope Martin V on 21 May 1425. Bishop Giovanni was transferred to the diocese of Gaeta on 15 October 1427. He died in 1440. Eubel I, pp. 258, 478.
  72. ^ Nicholas was transferred to the diocese of Segni. Ughelli I, p. 1298. Eubel I, p. 478.
  73. ^ Alessandro Trani: Gams, p. 738, column 2. Eubel II, p. 248.
  74. ^ Alexander held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure. He was appointed Bishop of Terracina by Pope Nicholas V on 15 January 1449. He died in 1455. Ughelli wrongly states that he died in 1458, being unaware of the existence of Franciscus de Licata. Ughelli I, p. 1298. Eubel Hierarchia catholica II, p. 248.
  75. ^ A native of Rome, Marcellini had been a Canon of the Basilica of the XII Apostles in Rome, and rose to be its Prior. He was named Bishop of Montefeltro on 12 August 1458 (according to Eubel, which seems unlikely, since Pope Calixtus III died on 6 August and there was no pope on August 12), and was still bishop-elect when transferred to the diocese of Terracina on 6 October 1458 by Pope Pius II. He died in Rome in 1490. Ughelli I, p. 1298. Cappelletti VI, p. 554. Eubel II, pp. 153, 248.
  76. ^ Francesco (not Antonio, as in Ughelli, p. 1298) was a native of Terracina, and held the degree of Doctor of law. He was named Bishop of Foligno on 20 November 1486, by Pope Innocent VIII. He was transferred to Terracina on 3 March 1490. He died in 1500. Cappelletti VI, pp. 554-555. Eubel II, pp. 156, 248.
  77. ^ Juan Galvez was a native of Seville, Spain. He was born in 1439. He was a Doctor in utroque iure, and a protege of Cardinal Oliviero Carafa. He was appointed President of the Apostolic Camera, the fifth-highest position in that department. He was a writer of papal bulls (scriptor apostolicarum bullarum), for whose services substantial fees were due from the intended recipients; he rose to be Master of the Registry of papal bulls. He was named Bishop of Terracina by Pope Julius II on 18 December 1500. He died, according to his tombstone, on 6 August 1507. Ughelli I, p. 1299. Eubel II, p. 248 with note 3.
  78. ^ Cardinal Carafa, who was Dean of the College of Cardinals was Administrator of the diocese from 20 August 1507 to 13 May 1510, when he resigned, upon the appointment of a regular bishop. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica III, p. 310.
  79. ^ Mori was Provost of the church of S. Lucia de Urbe. He was named Bishop of Terracina by Pope Julius II on 13 May 1510. The date of his death is unknown. He was still alive on 4 May 1515, when he subscribed the decrees of the Fifth Lateran Council. Ughelli I, p. 1299. Cappelletti VI, p. 555. Eubel III, p. 310.
  80. ^ Andrea Cybo was the son of Domenico d'Andrea Cibo, governor of the Marche (1460) and Bianchetta, the natural sister of Pope Innocent VIII (Cybo]]. Andrea's brother Alaone belonged to the Knights of Jerusalem, and Alalone's son was Consul of Genoa in Rome (1520); Andrea's brother Mario was a lieutenant in the papal guards. Andrea was named Bishop of Terracina by Pope Leo X on 20 April 1517. He died in 1522. Luigi Staffetti (1908). Atti della Società ligure di storia patria (in Italian). Vol. 38. Genoa: Società ligura di storia patria. pp. 257–258. Eubel III, p. 310.
  81. ^ De Copis was a native of Brabant. He was Abbreviator and then Corrector of Apostolic Letters. He was a Referendary of the Tribune of the Two Signatures. He was provided as Bishop of Terracina on 29 October 1522. He died on 15 August 1527, according to his tombstone. Ughelli I, p. 1299. Eubel III, p. 310.
  82. ^ Bonsi was a Florentine, the son of the noble Domenico Bonsi. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure, and was a Florentine ambassador )Orator). While on a mission to the papal court in 1528, he was named Bishop of Terracina by Pope Clement VII on 3 January 1528. Ughelli I, p. 1299-1300. He served as papal ambassador to France, to negotiate the marriage of Prince Henry and Catherine de Medicis; he died in Rome in 1533, following his return from France. Ughelli I, pp. 1299-1300. Cappelletti VI, p. 555. Eubel III, p. 310.
  83. ^ Cinzio Filonardi was a native of Bauco, a castllo in the diocese of Veroli. He was the son of Vellio Filonardi and Rita della Sgurgola, and the brother of Cardinal Ennio Filonardi. He served as pro-Legate of Perugia. He was appointed Bishop of Terracina on 7 November 1553 by Pope Julius III. He died in the first week of November 1524, at the age of 43, having served less than a year in office. Ughelli I, p. 1300. Cappelletti VI, p. 555. Eubel III, p. 310.
  84. ^ De Caris served for only forty days, according to Orlandi. Orlandi, Cesare. Delle città d'Italia e sue isole adjacenti compendiose notizie sacre, e profane compilate (in Italian). p. 60. Eubel III, p. 310, states that Filonardi died in November 1534, and that Argoli was appointed on 13 November 1534; this leaves no room for De Caris. An addition to Ughelli I, p. 1300, states that De Caris was appointed on 13 November and that Argoli was appointed on 23 November, likewise leaving no room for Orlandi's forty-day reign.
  85. ^ Argoli, whose family was from Tagliacozzo in the Abruzzi, had previously been titular bishop of Sidon. He was the papal Majordomo (Prefect of the Apostolic Palace) of Pope Paul III. He was appointed Bishop of Terracina on 13 November 1534. He was also First Custodian of the Holy House of Loreto. He died in 1540. Giovanni Pietro de' Crescenzi Romani (1642). Corona della nobilta d'Italia, ouero Compendio dell'istorie delle famiglie illustri (in Italian). Parte seconda. Bologna: per Nicolo Tebaldini. p. 727. Ughelli I, p. 1300. Cappelletti VI, p. 555. Eubel III, p. 310.
  86. ^ Ottaviano Sforza was the illegitimate son of Duke Gian Galeazzo of Milan. He may have been born in 1475, or 2 May 1477. Giuliano Passero (1785). Gherardo Cono Capobianco (ed.). Giuliano Passero, Cittadino Napoletano, o sia prima pubblicazione in istampa che delle storie in forma di giornali (in Italian). Napoli: V. Orsino. p. 32. He was appointed Bishop of Lodi on 27 October 1497 by Pope Alexander VI (Eubel II, p. 173), at the age of 22 (or 20), but being too young for consecration, he was only Administrator of the diocese. When the French captured the Duchy of Milan in 1499, Ottaviano was expelled, not returning until 1512, and an Apostolic Administrator was named. Still only bishop-elect, he resigned the diocese, and was transferred to Arezzo by Pope Leo X on 19 November 1519 (Eubel III, pp. 116; 220, note 2). He was named Bishop of Terracina on 24 November 1540 by Pope Paul III, and on 20 May 1541 was additionally given the title of Patriarch of Alexandria, which he retained until his death in 1545 (Eubel III, pp. 102; 220, with note 3).
  87. ^ Raverta was a native of Milan, and the nephew of his predecessor, for whom he had been acting as coadjutor with the right of succession. Raverta was named Bishop of Terracina on 27 November 1545, by Pope Paul III. He was nuncio in Switzerland (1553–1560) and Spain (1560, 1561). Ughelli says he died in Spain in 1562, disappointed that he did not become a cardinal, due to the death of Pope Paul IV. Francesco Sforza Pallavicino (1803). "Libro XIV, capitolo xii". Istoria del Concilio di Trento (in Italian). Tomo VIII. Venezia: G. Zanardi. pp. 353–354. Lettere Del Commendatore Annibal Caro, Scritte A Nome Del Cardinale Alessandro Franese (in Italian). Volume III. Padua: Comino. 1765. pp. 237–238, 292–296. Ughelli I, p. 1300. Eubel III, p. 310.
  88. ^ A native of Colle Val d'Elsa in Tuscany, Beltramini held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure, and was a familiaris of Pope Pius IV, who appointed him Bishop of Terracina on 21 June 1564. He was nominated papal nuncio to France from October 1565 to March 1566, but his nunciature was not acceptable to the French government. He died in Terracina in 1575. Henry Biaudet, Les nonciatures apostoliques permanents, jusqu'en 1648, (Helsinki: Suomalainen Tiedakatemia 1910), p. 253. Ludwig Pastor, History of the Popes, tr. R. Kerr, Volume XVI (London: Routledge 1928), p. 202 n. 2. Ughelli I, p. 1300. Eubel III, p. 310.
  89. ^ Beltramino was the brother of Francesco Beltramini. He was named Bishop of Terracina on 5 December 1575. He died, according to his tombstone, on 8 May 1582. Ughelli I, p. 1300. Eubel III, p. 310.
  90. ^ A native of Reggio Lepidi, Cardino was appointed Bishop of Terracina on 20 August 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII. He was known for his charity toward the poor. He died on 14 October 1594, at the age of sixty-three, according to his tombstone inscription. Cappelletti VI, pp. 556-557. Eubel III, p. 310.
  91. ^ "Perugini" seems not to be a surname, but a local origin designation. Fabrizio was appointed Bishop of Terracina e Sezze on 24 April 1595. He died in January 1608. Ughelli I, p. 1300. Cappelletti, pp. 557-558. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica III, p. 310. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 330.
  92. ^ De Magistris: Gauchat, p. 330 with note 3.
  93. ^ A native of Benevento, Ventimiglia held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure, and was a protonotary apostolic. He became an advocate, practicing before the Roman Rota, and was a Referendary of the Tribunal of the Two Signatures. He was then appointed Auditor in the papal Nunciature in Spain, under Archbishop Decio Carafa. He was appointed Bishop of Terracina by Pope Paul V on 12 January 1615. As bishop, he restored and extended the episcopal palace in Sezze (1642). He died in Sezze on 23 December 1645. Ughelli I, pp. 1300-1301. Cappelletti VI, p. 557. Gauchat, p. 330, with note 4.
  94. ^ Tassi: Gauchat, p. 330 with note 5.
  95. ^ On 1 September 1664, Ghislieri was appointed Bishop of Imola by Pope Alexander VII. Gauchat, p. 331 with note 6.
  96. ^ Angelotti: Gauchat, p. 331 with note 7.
  97. ^ Monanni was born in Monterchio in Tuscany in 1631. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure from the University of Pisa. He was Vicar General of the diocese of Velletri for Cardinal Francesco Barberini, and a Canon of the cathedral Chapter. He was appointed Bishop of Terracina on 22 August 1667 by Pope Clement IX. He died in Terracina in June 1710. Ughelli I, p. 1301 (who states that he was born in Monterchio in Florentine territory). Cappelletti VI, p. 559. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 330. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 371 with note 3.
  98. ^ Bernardo M. Conti was brother of Pope Innocent XIII and a cardinal (from 16 June 1721). Cappelletti VI, p. 559. Ritzler-Sefrin V, p. 372 with note 4.
  99. ^ Conventati: Ritzler-Sefrin V, p. 372 with note 5.
  100. ^ Oldi was born in Crema in 1671. He was a master in theology (1705). He served as titular Provincial of Saxony of his Order. He was appointed Bishop of Narni on 11 February 1718, and resigned on 27 January 1725. He was appointed titular bishop of Kastoria (Greece) on 3 March 1725, and named suffragan bishop of Ostia e Velletri by Pope Benedict XIII. He was appointed Bishop of Terracina on 9 December 1726. He died on 3 November 1749. Ritzler-Sefrin V, pp. 148 with note 2; 280 with note 7; 372 with note 6.
  101. ^ Palombella: Cappelletti VI, p. 603. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 397 with note 2.
  102. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin VI, p. 397 with note 3.
  103. ^ Ritzler-Sefrin VI, p. 397 with note 4.
  104. ^ Anselmi was appointed Bishop of San Severino (Marche) on 26 March 1792. Ritzler-Sefrin VI, p. 397 with note 5.
  105. ^ A native of Florence, Argelati was a priest of the Order of the Servants of Mary. He was a master of theology, and was parish priest of the church of S. Nicola in Arcione in Rome, next to the Servite convent of S. Nicola in Arcione. He was named titular bishop of Hippos (Palestine) on 1 June 1795, and appointed auxiliary bishop of Velletri. On 11 August 1800, he was transferred to the diocese of Terracina-Priverno-Sezze by Pope Pius VII. He died on 22 March 1805. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VII, p. 362. Alfred Baudrillart, ed. (1993). Dictionnaire d'histoire et de géographie ecclésiastiques. Encylopédie des sciences ecclésiastiques, Vol. 4 (in French). Volume 24. Paris: Letouzey et Ané. p. 651.
  106. ^ Trionfetti was born at Monte Franco (archdiocese of Spoleto) in 1803. He had previously been Minister General of the Order of Friars Minor (Franciscans) from 1856 to 1862. He was appointed Bishop of Terracina on 25 September 1862 by Pope Pius IX. He resigned the diocese on 23 February 1880, and retired to a Franciscan convent. He died in 1884. Annuario Pontificio 1863 (Roma 1863), p. 215. Bruno Bellone (1966). I vescovi dello stato Pontificio al Concilio Vaticano I (in Italian). Rome: Libreria editrice della pontificia Università Lateranense. pp. 65–72.
  107. ^ CV of Bishop Crociata: Diocesi di Latina, "Vescovo: Biografia"; retrieved: 18 May 2020. (in Italian)

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