Wikipedia

Second term of Tung Chee-hwa as Chief Executive of Hong Kong

Second Tung Chee-hwa Government
Regional Emblem of Hong Kong.svg

2nd Government of the Hong Kong

Special Administrative Region
Tung Chee Hwa (Feb 2011).jpg
Date formed 1 July 2002 (2002-07-01)
Date dissolved 12 March 2005 (2005-03-12)
People and organisations
Head of state Jiang Zemin (until 2003)

Hu Jintao (since 2003)
Head of government Tung Chee-hwa
No. of ministers 14
Member parties DAB, LP, FTU, TA
Status in legislature Pro-Beijing majority
Opposition party Pro-democracy camp
History
Election(s) 2002 Chief Executive election
Legislature term(s) 2nd Legislative Council

3rd Legislative Council
Predecessor First Tung administration
Successor First Tsang administration

The Second term of Tung Chee-hwa as Chief Executive of Hong Kong, or Tung administration, officially considered part of "The 2nd term Chief Executive of Hong Kong", relates to the period of governance of Hong Kong since the transfer of sovereignty of Hong Kong, between 1 July 2002 and 12 March 2005 until Tung Chee-hwa resigned from the office and the rest of the term was taken up by former Chief Secretary for Administration Donald Tsang.

Election [ edit ]

Incumbent Tung Chee-hwa was nominated by the 800-member Election Committee (EC) without contest despite his declining popularity. The pro-democracy camp argued that the electoral process was deliberately designed to obstruct any challenge to Tung.

Cabinet [ edit ]

Under the Principal Officials Accountability System introduced by Tung Chee-hwa in July 2002, there were 3 Secretaries of Department and 11 Directors of Bureau. Under the new system, all heads of bureaux became members of the Executive Council, and came directly under the Chief Executive instead of the Chief Secretary or the Financial Secretary.

Ministry [ edit ]

Two major officials under serve criticisms resigned during the political crisis in July 2003: Financial Secretary Antony Leung resigned in July after the "Lexusgate" scandal and Secretary for Security Regina Ip after the controversial Hong Kong Basic Law Article 23 legislation.

Portfolio Minister Took office Left office Party
Chief Executive   Tung Chee-hwa 1 July 2002 12 March 2005 Nonpartisan
Chief Secretary for Administration   Donald Tsang 1 May 2001 31 May 2005 Nonpartisan
Financial Secretary   Antony Leung 1 May 2001 16 July 2003 Nonpartisan
  Henry Tang 5 August 2003 Tsang I Nonpartisan
Secretary for Justice   Elsie Leung 1 July 1997 Tsang I Nonpartisan
Secretary for the Civil Service   Joseph Wong 1 July 2002 Tsang I Nonpartisan
Secretary for Commerce, Industry and Technology   Henry Tang 1 July 2002 3 August 2003 Nonpartisan
  John Tsang 5 August 2003 Tsang I Nonpartisan
Secretary for Constitutional Affairs   Stephen Lam 1 July 2002 Tsang I Nonpartisan
Secretary for Economic Development and Labour   Stephen Ip 1 July 2002 Tsang I Nonpartisan
Secretary for Education and Manpower   Arthur Li 1 July 2002 Tsang I Nonpartisan
Secretary for the Environment, Transport and Works   Sarah Liao 1 July 2002 Tsang I Nonpartisan
Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury   Frederick Ma 1 July 2002 Tsang I Nonpartisan
Secretary for Health, Welfare and Food   Yeoh Eng-kiong 1 July 2002 11 October 2004 Nonpartisan
  York Chow 12 October 2004 Tsang I Nonpartisan
Secretary for Home Affairs   Patrick Ho 1 July 2002 Tsang I Nonpartisan
Secretary for Housing, Planning and Lands   Michael Suen 1 July 2002 Tsang I Nonpartisan
Secretary for Security   Regina Ip 1 July 2002 24 July 2003 Nonpartisan
  Ambrose Lee 5 August 2003 Tsang I Nonpartisan

Executive Council non-official members [ edit ]

The Executive Council was headed by Chief Executive and with total of 19 members: 3 secretaries and 11 directors of the bureaux as official members and 5 non-official members. All non-official members except for Convenor Leung Chun-ying was newly appointed by Tung Chee-hwa.

Tung allied himself with the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment of Hong Kong (DAB) and the Liberal Party,[1] by appointing chairmen of the Liberal Party and DAB, James Tien and Jasper Tsang Yok-sing to the Executive Council to form a "ruling alliance."[2]

On 5 July 2003, James Tien resigned from the ExCo to show objection to the legislation of Hong Kong Basic Law Article 23, after more than 500,000 people marched on 1 July. Tung later on appointed Selina Chow, also from the Liberal Party to replace Tien.

In October 2004, Tung appointed two additional non-official members to the Executive Council.

Members Affiliation Portfolio Took Office Left Office Ref
CY Leung Nonpartisan Non-official Convenor of the ExCo;

Chartered surveyor
1 July 1997 Tsang I
Jasper Tsang DAB Legislative Councillor 1 July 2002 Tsang I
Cheng Yiu-tong FTU General secretary of FTU 1 July 2002 Tsang I
Andrew Liao Nonpartisan Former deputy judge of High Court 1 July 2002 Tsang I [3]
James Tien Liberal Legislative Councillor 1 July 2002 5 July 2003
Selina Chow Liberal Legislative Councillor 22 September 2003 Tsang I
Laura Cha Nonpartisan Non-executive deputy chairman of HSBC 19 October 2004 Tsang I [4]
Bernard Chan Alliance Businessman and politician 26 October 2004 Tsang I

See also [ edit ]

References [ edit ]

  1. ^ Staff reporter (13 June 2002). "Tung set to strengthen power base". The Standard. Archived from the original on 22 May 2011. Retrieved 23 July 2008.
  2. ^ Michael DeGolyer (1 January 2003). "Stating the obvious". The Standard. Archived from the original on 30 April 2008. Retrieved 11 January 2007.
  3. ^ "The Honourable Andrew LIAO Cheung-sing, GBS, SC, JP". Executive Council. Archived from the original on 27 April 2014. Retrieved 2 May 2013.
  4. ^ "The Honourable Mrs Laura CHA SHIH May-lung, GBS, JP". Executive Council. Retrieved 2 May 2013. [permanent dead link]
Preceded by

Tung I
Government of Hong Kong

2002–2005
Succeeded by

Tsang I
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