Wikipedia

The Palm Beach Post

The Palm Beach Post
The Palm Beach Post front page.jpg
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Owner(s) Gannett [1]
Editor Tim Burke
Founded 1916
Headquarters 2751 South Dixie Highway

West Palm Beach, Florida 33405

United States
Circulation 88,231 Daily

142,679 Sunday[2][dead link]
ISSN 1528-5758
Website PalmBeachPost.com

The Palm Beach Post is an American daily newspaper serving Palm Beach County in South Florida, and parts of the Treasure Coast. On March 18, 2018, in a landmark deal worth 42.35 million US Dollars, The Palm Beach Post and Palm Beach Daily News were purchased by New York-based New Media Investment Group Inc. who own and operate the Palm Beach Post, all circulations and associated digital media sources to this day.

History [ edit ]

The Palm Beach Post began as The Palm Beach County, a weekly newspaper established in 1910. On Jan. 5, 1916, the weekly became a daily, morning publication known as The Palm Beach Post.

In 1934, Palm Beach businessman Edward R. Bradley bought The Palm Beach Post and The Palm Beach Times, the afternoon daily (except on Sunday). In 1947, both were purchased by longtime resident John Holliday Perry, Sr., who owned a Florida newspaper chain of six dailies and 15 weeklies. In 1948, Perry purchased both the Palm Beach Daily News, the main newspaper for the island of Palm Beach, and the society magazine Palm Beach Life.

In June 1969, Cox Enterprises, based in Atlanta, purchased Perry's Palm Beach and West Palm Beach publications and formed Palm Beach Newspapers, Inc. Cox was founded by James M. Cox, a former Ohio governor and the 1920 Democratic presidential candidate who built a media company that today includes daily newspapers; weekly newspapers, radio and television stations; U.S. cable TV systems, local Internet media sites and Mannheim auto auction locations.

In 1979, The Palm Beach Times was renamed The Evening Times. In 1987, The Evening Times and The Post merged into a single morning newspaper under The Palm Beach Post name. In 1989, all of neighboring sister publication Miami News assets and archives were merged with The Palm Beach Post upon the closure of that paper.

In 1996, The Palm Beach Post sponsored Scripps National Spelling Bee winner Wendy Guey.

Palm Beach Post photographer Dallas Kinney won the 1970 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography for his portfolio of pictures of Florida migrant workers, Migration to Misery. Post photographers have subsequently been Pulitzer finalists three times.[3]

Editor Edward Sears won the Editor of the Year award in 2004 from Editor & Publisher. Sears led the Post newsroom from 1985-2005.[4]

On Oct. 31, 2017, Cox Media Group announced its plans to sell The Palm Beach Post and Palm Beach Daily News. In 2018, it was announced that GateHouse Media would buy the newspapers for $49.25 million, with the deal closing on May 1.

Recent operations [ edit ]

In March 1996, PalmBeachPost.com was launched.

In June 2008, The Post’s leaders decided to focus on the core readership area of Palm Beach County and southern Martin County. As digital readership grows, print readership slows. Faced with economic downturn and a changing industry, The Post reduced its payroll of 1,350 to about 1,000 and closes bureaus in Stuart, Port St. Lucie and Delray Beach.

In December 2008, The Post closed its presses and moved printing to the Deerfield Beach plant of the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel.

On March 18, 2018, The Palm Beach Post was sold to the New York-based New Media Investment Group Inc. in a landmark deal worth $42.35 Million US Dollars.

In August 2018, The Post’s digital team launched the GateHouse Florida Digital Audience team to expand GateHouse’s digital audience across Florida.

In April 4, 2019, the Posts longtime editor Tim Burke accepted a lucrative position worth hundreds of thousands of dollars with LRP Media Group after sale of the Palm Beach Post and all subsidies to the New York Conglomerate, New Media Investment Group. LRP is currently registered as a political research group in the State of FL.

89,397: Sunday print circulation, yearly average (2018)

64,978: Monday through Saturday print circulation, yearly average (2018)

45,478: Monday through Sunday print and electronic circulation, yearly average (2019).

See also [ edit ]

References [ edit ]

  1. ^ https://www.palmbeachpost.com/ownership
  2. ^ "2012 Top 100 Daily Newspapers in the U.S. by Circulation"(PDF). BurrellesLuce. January 2013. Retrieved March 21, 2013. [dead link]
  3. ^ Pulitzer.org.
  4. ^ E&P Staff (January 5, 2005). "'Palm Beach Post' Editor Edward Sears to Retire". Editor & Publisher. Retrieved June 1, 2014.

External links [ edit ]

What is this?